sustainability

Mālama Hāloa – Protecting the Taro

Taro grower and Native Hawaiian practitioner Jerry Konanui works to propagate and save from extinction the numerous varieties of kalo (taro), a staple of the Hawaiian diet. Jerry’s mission is also to protect kalo, revered as the elder sibling (Hāloa) of the Hawaiian people, from the risks of genetic engineering.

Nā Keiki o ka ‘Āina – Children of the Land

In the shadow of Ka‘ala mountain on the Wai‘anae coast of O‘ahu, a unique community project is creating a unique educational curriculum. Gigi Cocquio, a native of Italy, has set up a community farm in Mākaha and works with the children of Mākaha Elementary School to discover the value of mālama ‘āina, caring for the land that feeds them.

Ahupua‘a, Fishponds and Lo‘i TRANSCRIPT

The Hawaiian system of land use allowed access to all resources in the ahupua‘a, a land division that stretches from mountain to sea. Within the ahupua‘a, highly specialized technologies such as fishponds and lo‘i kalo (taro gardens) ensured an abundance of food.

He Huaka‘i Māka‘ika‘i me Kupuna Rachel Nahaleelua Mahuiki

(“A walking tour with Kupuna Rachel Nahaleelua Mahuiki”)
 
Rachel Nahaleelua Mahuiki, one of Hanalei’s most beloved kūpuna (elders), leads Larry Kimura and a group of Hawaiian language teachers on a tour of Hā‘ena, Kaua‘i.

Stolen Waters

This video documents the battle over the water in Waiāhole Ditch on the island of O‘ahu, where taro farmers and long-time residents seek to reclaim the natural stream waters that were taken in the early 1900’s by sugar plantations.

The Caretakers of Ka Lae TRANSCRIPT

The story of a Hawaiian family who made a home at Ka Lae (South Point), a remote and rugged area at the southernmost tip of the island of Hawai‘i. For eleven years, under threat of eviction by the Department of Hawaiian Home Lands, the Viernes family remained committed to caring for and preserving the sacred and historic sites of Ka Kae.

The Caretakers of Ka Lae

The story of a Hawaiian family who made a home at Ka Lae (South Point), a remote and rugged area at the southernmost tip of the island of Hawai‘i.

Kapu Ka‘ū TRANSCRIPT

A unique portrait of one of Hawai‘i’s most remote and rugged districts, Ka‘ū, located on the southern flanks of Mauna Loa on the island of Hawai‘i. The people of Ka‘ū, known historically for their fierce independence, relate stories of a lifestyle closely tied to the land and the sea.

Kapu Ka‘ū

Kapu Kaʻū is a unique portrait of one of Hawai‘i’s most remote and rugged districts, Ka‘ū, located on the southern flanks of Mauna Loa on the island of Hawai‘i. The people of Ka‘ū, known historically for their independence and resilience, relate stories of a lifestyle closely tied to the land and the sea.

Ho‘āla Hou – A Look to the Future TRANSCRIPT

The Hawaiian term ho‘āla hou means to awaken anew. Hosted by artist and philosopher Sam Ka‘ai, this program looks at the re-emergence of a Pacific way of thinking, of seeking self-sufficiency, and of preserving the cultural heritage of the first people of Hawai‘i.

Kalo Pa‘a o Waiāhole – Hard Taro of Waiāhole TRANSCRIPT

Kalo Pa‘a o Waiāhole – Hard Taro of Waiāhole explores the issues surrounding the allocation of water that flows in the Waiāhole Ditch on the island of O‘ahu. The title comes from an old saying referring to the stubbornness of the people of Waiāhole valley.

Mākua – To Heal the Nation TRANSCRIPT

Located on the western tip of the Hawaiian island of O‘ahu, Mākua has long been a place of refuge for Kānaka Maoli, native Hawaiians. One of the last undeveloped valleys on the island, Mākua has become a home for the houseless, the unemployed, working poor, and those that simply want to live the lifestyle of their ancestors.

Ho‘āla Hou – A Look to the Future

The Hawaiian term ho‘āla hou means to awaken anew. Hosted by artist and philosopher Sam Ka‘ai, this program looks at the re-emergence of a Pacific way of thinking, of seeking self-sufficiency, and of preserving the cultural heritage of the first people of Hawai‘i.

West Beach Story

Residents of the Wai‘anae coast community on O‘ahu react to the proposed Ko Olina resort development and predict its potential impact on their land, water resources, ocean fisheries and rural lifestyle.